A Thirst for Empire – T Ching


Tea has a rich and varied history, but you’d be surprised at what a HUGE impact it had on the modern world. The book, ‘Thirst for Empire’ focuses on how tea was developed from an obscure commodity only available to the rich to a driver for imperial expansion and mass marketing that affects us to this very day.

The book starts off just as tea was becoming an important commodity and its primary source being from China. To the British, this became the opportunity to use their vast trade networks to control distribution and later production of this product. But because it was relatively unknown to the common person, markets and demand needed to be created.

Tea itself was a new beverage that competed with existing industries at the time, and because it was foreign was seen as a threat by some. So between domestic habits (i.e. beer) that may have been impacted or distrust of foreign goods, there were plenty of early critics, as evidenced by a popular writer below:

“Tea was an idle custom; an absurd expense, tending to create fantastic desires, and bad habits, which must render us less happy or more miserable than we should otherwise be”.

The Feminine Aspect

Part of tea culture became associated with women, initially because, although tea was sold in coffee houses, many women of means didn’t enter those overwhelmingly male establishments. Twinings was one of the first to recognize this and created tea specific stores nearby aimed at women.

But apart from this, the book shows how the tea house movement exploded in London particularly, and became a huge business.

Temperance Movements and Processed Food

Tea became the obvious choice for the rise of temperance movements in the 19th century. Shunning alcohol, these societies created lavish tea parties to attract new members; and offered all sorts of breads, cakes, butter, cream, fruit, and sugar. In a roundabout way, these movements with tea at its core contributed to a change in eating habits and dramatic increase in the consumption of sugar.

Globalism and Free Trade

As the 18th and 19th centuries progressed, globalism and world trade increased. Tea and other commodities like it were a source of major tax revenue. And these policies created friction, eventually leading the North American colonies to thumb their noses at tea. The Boston Tea party was a result, which led to harsher punitive measures by the crown, which led to armed revolt.

There was a point where the entire British navy was funded by the tax on tea; and the rise of the East India Company, a massive multinational company with implicit state support reigned supreme.

Establishing Food Standards

Tea also led to such conflicts as the opium wars: With the British supplying opium to China to counter the trade surplus that occurred with China. Later on, India was found to have some great growing regions and a movement of pacification and exploitation to convert countryside into tea plantations took place. As a result, there was a push to encourage the purchase of tea from these imperially-controlled areas, and charges of adulteration (some of it being true) of Chinese tea along with racist stories (i.e. Chinese tea contains the sweat of dirty plantation workers) to convert more British consumers to drinking “empire” tea.

It was the adulteration of tea–such as using food coloring to change a green tea into black–that led to a series of standards for inspection and certification, which became some of the first food safety laws.

Spread and Decline of Empire

Tea was also thought of as a way to pacify and civilize British empire subjects, from India to Africa. It was thought of as a way to impose British standards of civilization upon their subjects, whether they liked it or not. It is interesting how India resisted tea at first, then made tea their own by spicing it up, going against British norms.

Eventually there were nationalistic movements to support the empire and to persuade people to only buy tea with EMPIRE tea logos on it. This was particularly emphasized in the beginning of the 20th century and during World War 1.

During the post-World War 1 depression, tea became the subject of commercial campaigns, with professional organizations funded by growers to market and advertise tea not only in Britain, but her colonies. Here we saw massive consumer relation campaigns with cartoon characters like “Mr. Pott” to push the mantra of “tea revives you.”

During World War 2, tea became a comfort while the world was in flames, with a cup of tea giving the British the ‘keep calm and carry on’ attitude during the Blitz and offering comforts of home to soldiers fighting thousands of miles from home.

The end of the book deals with the decline of tea after the war. With the British empire effectively dismantled, the United States was now the global superpower, and with it, American products and marketing flooded the world.

Where tea was a staple, the familiar Coca Cola signs sprung up. Mass market soft drink and, hip coffee bars all took a toll on tea consumption, as did the geopolitical disruptions in the former colonies affect production.

Summary

This book is a very detailed historic account of how the business of tea affected all aspects of the world socially, economically, and militarily. And while there are  enormous amounts of details to sift through, those who are fond of tea will especially appreciate the numerous side stories of this important beverage. Peppered throughout are photos, and the early marketing slogans and advertisements are especially interesting. A great addition to any library, and pairs well with tea! 

 



The Importance Of Teapot Design


One of the many perks of founding T Ching is that I get solicited by tea and teaware companies to review their products. I was delighted to get such a request from notNeutral regarding their CALA collection of teaware.

When my box arrived, I was very excited to have a look and actually hold my teapot. After removing the outer box, I was impressed with their white packaging. When companies take the time to produce interesting packaging, it sets the stage for what will be inside. I was not disappointed: I was immediately taken with their elegant and modern teapot interpretation. This sleek 16-ounce porcelain teapot with removable strainer basket accomplishes three very important tasks: It provides an optimal space for whole leaf tea brewing, a smooth pour, and visual excitement. I received two 6-ounce tasting cups which are equally as elegant and beautiful as the pot. This is a set that my husband and I will use every day, rather than wait for special occasions with company. As many of you have come to learn, a poorly designed teapot isn’t enjoyable to use. When consideration has been taken to ensure that each task it must perform is done to a high standard, you will be ensured of a teapot that you’ll enjoy for many, many years to come.

Many of you may not have noticed the tagline on the top left of the blog which reads Tea // Design // Life.  For me, design is such an important element in our lives. To interact with objects that bring beauty into our daily routine is something that resonates with me. Each artisan teacup, each handcrafted teapot, each exquisitely designed teapot is something that connects me with the artist or designer. When I put my whole leat tea into such an object, I also acknowledge the tea grower whose efforts provided the tea for my daily ritual. We are all connected. We are all part of the tea culture that I so love and embrace.

How about treating yourself to a very special tea set. It will bring you pleasure each and every day.



Blast From the Past: Tea and . . . honey?


Tea and honey go together like peanut butter and jelly, rice and butter, pasta and sauce.  We know, from tea experts here, how environmental, and even political factors can affect tea production.  And now we have discovered that tea’s favorite sweetener, honey, is being threatened – by harm to the honeybee – from a number of sources.

Pesticides, factory farming favoring high margin crops, lack of plant species honeybees need to survive, mites, fungus –  and maybe factors we don’t even know about yet – have drastically harmed honeybee colonies.

12637209434_fb2db2bb69_zNot only do the bees produce honey, they pollenate essential food crops, and up to one-third of our food supply could be affected. Years before the epidemic of bee death, a genius named Albert Einstein surmised:  “If the bee disappears from the surface of the earth, man would have no more than four years to live. No more bees, no more pollination, no more men.”

More recently, another phenomenon has been occurring, which is collapse of the colony.  Worker bees simply and suddenly just disappear, leaving the colony decimated.  Scientists have theories, but nothing conclusive, as to why this is happening.

Those are the facts, but let’s not end on a negative note.  There are actions all of us can take to help in our own little way, while the great scientists ponder potential solutions on a grander scale.  We can stop using pesticides (I’ve read even ‘organic’ sprays that have dire warnings); we can plant species that bees live on (as they are literally starving); we can support beekeepers in our area by buying local honey; and we can make others aware of the situation.12838157654_8aa4cff090_m

Next time you put a spoon or squeeze of honey in your tea, remember that even if a mega-corporation can produce artificial honey-like substances, only bees can make real honey. and mega-corporations can’t pollinate one-third of foods we need to survive.

Or can they?

If the bees are gone, they will need to think of something . . . and fast.

IMAGE 1 Source
IMAGE 2 Source  

Article originally posted in May 2014, written by Diane Walden.



Blast From the Past: Tea and . . . honey?


Tea and honey go together like peanut butter and jelly, rice and butter, pasta and sauce.  We know, from tea experts here, how environmental, and even political factors can affect tea production.  And now we have discovered that tea’s favorite sweetener, honey, is being threatened – by harm to the honeybee – from a number of sources.

Pesticides, factory farming favoring high margin crops, lack of plant species honeybees need to survive, mites, fungus –  and maybe factors we don’t even know about yet – have drastically harmed honeybee colonies.

12637209434_fb2db2bb69_zNot only do the bees produce honey, they pollenate essential food crops, and up to one-third of our food supply could be affected. Years before the epidemic of bee death, a genius named Albert Einstein surmised:  “If the bee disappears from the surface of the earth, man would have no more than four years to live. No more bees, no more pollination, no more men.”

More recently, another phenomenon has been occurring, which is collapse of the colony.  Worker bees simply and suddenly just disappear, leaving the colony decimated.  Scientists have theories, but nothing conclusive, as to why this is happening.

Those are the facts, but let’s not end on a negative note.  There are actions all of us can take to help in our own little way, while the great scientists ponder potential solutions on a grander scale.  We can stop using pesticides (I’ve read even ‘organic’ sprays that have dire warnings); we can plant species that bees live on (as they are literally starving); we can support beekeepers in our area by buying local honey; and we can make others aware of the situation.12838157654_8aa4cff090_m

Next time you put a spoon or squeeze of honey in your tea, remember that even if a mega-corporation can produce artificial honey-like substances, only bees can make real honey. and mega-corporations can’t pollinate one-third of foods we need to survive.

Or can they?

If the bees are gone, they will need to think of something . . . and fast.

IMAGE 1 Source
IMAGE 2 Source  

Article originally posted in May 2014, written by Diane Walden.



The Importance Of Teapot Design


One of the many perks of founding T Ching is that I get solicited by tea and teaware companies to review their products. I was delighted to get such a request from notNeutral regarding their CALA collection of teaware.

When my box arrived, I was very excited to have a look and actually hold my teapot. After removing the outer box, I was impressed with their white packaging. When companies take the time to produce interesting packaging, it sets the stage for what will be inside. I was not disappointed: I was immediately taken with their elegant and modern teapot interpretation. This sleek 16-ounce porcelain teapot with removable strainer basket accomplishes three very important tasks: It provides an optimal space for whole leaf tea brewing, a smooth pour, and visual excitement. I received two 6-ounce tasting cups which are equally as elegant and beautiful as the pot. This is a set that my husband and I will use every day, rather than wait for special occasions with company. As many of you have come to learn, a poorly designed teapot isn’t enjoyable to use. When consideration has been taken to ensure that each task it must perform is done to a high standard, you will be ensured of a teapot that you’ll enjoy for many, many years to come.

Many of you may not have noticed the tagline on the top left of the blog which reads Tea // Design // Life.  For me, design is such an important element in our lives. To interact with objects that bring beauty into our daily routine is something that resonates with me. Each artisan teacup, each handcrafted teapot, each exquisitely designed teapot is something that connects me with the artist or designer. When I put my whole leat tea into such an object, I also acknowledge the tea grower whose efforts provided the tea for my daily ritual. We are all connected. We are all part of the tea culture that I so love and embrace.

How about treating yourself to a very special tea set. It will bring you pleasure each and every day.



The Tea Dragon Society – T Ching


While researching a topic I was considering writing about, I (happily!) stumbled across a delightful short comic called “The Tea Dragon Society” by author and artist Katie O’Neill. As a lifelong comic fan as well as having a tiny (haha) interest in tea, I was intrigued. I read the entire comic in short order and was completely enchanted!

Greta

Set in a magical fantasy world where “people” includes both human and sentient humanoid animals, the comic is told from the perspective of a teen girl named Greta of goblin and oxen descent who is learning from her mother to be a blacksmith. Greta happens across a “tea dragon” in need of rescue, and subsequently returns it to its owner. And that’s how we learn that in this world, tea isn’t a plant: It’s harvested from the antlers of tiny pet dragons, who need careful love and care to thrive! So each flavor or type of tea is a different type of dragon, each with its own unique personality.

The story is sweet and charming, but also casually blends in progressive ideals. There is a friendship between teen girls who come from wildly different backgrounds, an established homosexual relationship, and a character who is physically disabled. I thought the author/artist handled the inclusion of these concepts gracefully, subtly introducing them in a way that did an excellent job of normalizing and showing that it’s just life.

The tea dragon “Jasmine”

The art is colorful and bright, with bold backgrounds and a minimization of hard lines. The attention to detail when it comes to the numerous plants, emotional responses, and subtle highlighting is exceptional. Relying more on subtle shading and shapes than the typical line-heavy comic style, the story is more what one is accustomed to from a children’s book. It’s no wonder it has won numerous accolades and awards as a result, including:

A 2018 Eisner Award Finalist
ALA Rainbow List (2018)

Winner of the 2018 Dwayne McDuffie Award for Kids Comics
Amazon.com’s Best Comics & Graphic Novels (2017)
School Library Journal’s Top 10 Graphic Novels (2017)

“The Tea Dragon Society” is available in its entirety to read online, but can also be purchased in hardback print form on Amazon, which I highly recommend!

Images acquired from the comic website, with permission of author/artist Katie O’Neill.



Bulletproof Tea Recipes You Must Try On The Keto Diet


Guest post by: Claire Adams

Coffee lovers on the Keto diet can easily find incredible bulletproof coffee recipes to fuel there mornings. Tea lovers, on the other hand, are often neglected when it comes to bulletproof beverages. For tea lovers on the Keto diet, nothing is more satisfying than a piping hot cup of rich, creamy tea.

If you’re looking for the best bulletproof coffee recipes for Keto, you can find them here. If, however, you appreciate the finer things in life and want to combine your love of tea with your diet plan, read on for bulletproof tea recipes you must try.

Bulletproof Earl Grey

Earl Grey is one of the most well-known and well-loved teas in the world. This black tea with hints of citrus was originally created by a Chinese tea master as a gift for Charles Grey, an Earl and Prime Minister of Britain during the 1800s. Since then, Earl Grey has become the epitome of British tea culture and a fan favorite worldwide. To make it bulletproof, you will need:

  • 1 cup of hot Earl Grey tea
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter, preferably grass-fed
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil

Blend the ingredients, being mindful of the hot liquid. For some extra flavor, add the zest of an orange peel to your mixture.

Bulletproof Matcha Green Tea

Matcha has been taking the health world by storm over the past few years, due to its appetite-curbing, antioxidant benefits. This powder is a form of pulverized green tea, which can be added to drinks, baked goods, and even ice cream for a boost of flavor and nutrients. To make a hot cup of bulletproof matcha green tea, you will need:

  • 1 cup freshly steeped Matcha tea
  • 1 tbsp MCT oil
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter, preferably grass-fed
  • 1 tsp sweetener (optional)

Add the ingredients to the tea one at a time and blend. This also translates well into a frozen beverage or tea-lightful twist on a latte with the addition of heavy whipping cream.

Bulletproof Chai Tea Latte

If the idea of a bulletproof matcha green tea latte appeals to you, then wait until you try a bulletproof chai tea latte. Traditionally, chai tea offers a flavorful blend of spices, including cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, and even black pepper! Unlike many black teas, chai tea was usually mixed with an abundance of honey and milk for a sweet, milky drink that set it apart from the rest. This morphed into the modern chai tea latte over time. For a bulletproof chai tea latte, you will need:

  • 1 cup of hot, freshly brewed, herbal chai tea (not the premixed version with milk)
  • 1 tbsp butter, preferably grass-fed
  • 1 tbsp organic coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp heavy cream
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp sweetener (optional)

Carefully blend the ingredients one at a time, allowing the cream to mix with the oil. For extra flavor, froth some heavy cream separately until foamy and layer over top. Add a sprinkle of cinnamon for a coffee house feel you can enjoy at home.

When it comes to Keto-friendly bulletproof tea, if you can dream it, you can do it. Try using your favorite tea blend and develop your own bulletproof concoction!

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Claire is a personal and professional development expert who believes that a positive attitude is one of the keys to success.
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The Caffeine Issue – T Ching


OMG! Green tea has way too much caffeine in it! I’m not drinking that.

Caffeine. It’s the biggest excuse I hear to shoot green tea down in flames. This whole caffeine argument is the most opinionated topic there is on tea! People blindly spout off that there is more caffeine in green tea than coffee. It makes them feel justified for not drinking green tea as if it isn’t healthy after all.

Caffeine – but not as we know it

Glorious caffeine! It’s been dogged to death and someone needs to redeem it…that’ll be me, thanks.

Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant. In studies in Austria*, caffeine has been shown to increase memory; findings prove caffeine can stimulate hair growth on balding men** (I knew someone would do research on this!); it can help you recover 48 percent quicker from post-workout muscle soreness according to researchers at the University of Georgia; and even eye spasms (blepharospasm) can be controlled says a study in The Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. Of course, we also know that it helps us stay awake when we are driving, gets us moving first thing in the morning, relieves headaches, and boosts stamina during exercising.

Is all caffeine the same?

Caffeine acts differently in green tea than it does in coffee, but why? It boils down to metabolization. Caffeine binds to the catechins in green tea and as they are metabolized and broken down, they “time-release” the caffeine into your bloodstream. Because there is more to metabolize with the bond between caffeine and the catechins in green tea, it slows down the release so you feel alert and not hyper. Enter Theanine, green tea’s incredible amino acid, and the dance of caffeine mellows even more.

Coffee, on the other hand, doesn’t have this superpower combination. It’s the bean, not the leaf, which makes your system acidic and jittery. Coffee is the so-called acid trip you imagine it to be.

What I find really interesting is what happens when Theanine mingles with caffeine. It’s this tango of caffeine and Theanine that gives you the bliss and clarity, the relaxed alert state, which is so pronounced when you drink green tea. You need both in the proper ratio to get that feeling. The Theanine and caffeine combination also reduces physical stress and gets the creative juices flowing.

A good way to get your head around this caffeine issue is to visualize two rubber bands. One is the short chubby kind like you might find on a bundle of asparagus and the other is the vermicelli-thin one that might be found on a roll of fliers.

Now, take the short, chubby one and imagine stretching it to its maximum point. It doesn’t go very far before snapping at you, right? Do the same with the thin one. See how it seems to stretch forever with a smooth motion? The chubby one represents coffee and the long thin one is green tea. The coffee caffeine delivery is short lived and snaps back at you. It gives you a quick wake up and then causes you to crash. Green tea, on the other hand, provides a gentle, continuous release of caffeine and doesn’t snap back. I really like this simple and memorable analogy, which my Chinese colleague nicknamed Mr. Bean, told me over a bowl of rubbery chicken feet one day.

Sources:

  • *Radiological Society of North America’s annual meeting, Chicago, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 2005. American Dietetic Association: “Cutting Down on Caffeine.” News release, Radiological Society of North America.
  • **International Journal of Dermatology: T. W. Fischer MD, U. C. Hipler PhD, P. Elsner MD – Article first published online: 3 JAN 2007: DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-4632.2007.03119.x

Image provided by author



Tea and the Concept of Experience Economy


I recently attended an Adobe software conference tied to the theme of experience business or experience economy.  The general idea behind that concept is this:  As economies evolve people go from demanding basic goods (agrarian- and then industrial-based economies) to demanding services and specific forms of experiences (service- and then experience-based economies).  The higher the level of value the more that can be charged; “experiences” can command higher pricing than typical services.

It’s not necessarily simple to tie this back to tea.  A bestseller “The Starbucks Experience: 5 Principles for Turning Ordinary Into Extraordinary” outlines how that company built an empire by shifting themes and adding more value.  

Of course we’ve now seen that approach not work related to being duplicated for tea sales.  This World Tea News article from January 2016 explained how all the Teavana cafes were closing, but the retail stores were doing fine, and then in July of 2017 Starbucks announced they were closing all those shops.  I won’t try to interpret that, since related factors were surely complicated, but it probably works to say that sorting out the best approach to selling tea isn’t simple.

Former NYC Teavana café

I’m noticing a divide in experiences related to this theme and tea.  By far the most popular teas sold in Bangkok are bubble tea or other flavored, sweetened, milk-based take-away versions that might as well have tapioca pearls at the bottom, even when they don’t.  It’s a beverage item and that’s it. Tea enthusiasts are at the other end of the spectrum. There can be secondary emphasis on ceremony or collecting gear but it’s mostly about the overall experience.

Of course it’s still about the tea, right?  Discussion arises about teaware, preparation methodology, and even subjects like health concerns; in places like online groups or at events, but in the end it comes back to liking aspects of the brewed teas.  That’s where the experience is, there is just plenty of room left for framing that.

Related to this split there might be a normal experience or preference curve of sorts, as people shift from floral blends, Tazo tea bags, and matcha lattes onto Gongfu-style brewing something like Dan Cong oolong or aged sheng pu’er.  True to the theory, as the demand transitions to a different focus it’s much less about price.

Focus on minimizing level of cost can even invert.  Someone recently claimed in an online comment to have only spent under $200 on a sheng pu’er cake once this year, quickly qualified as a smaller 200 gram cake.  Bulk order photos are a different form of demonstrating status in consumption level. $200 orders can look impressive, but then a single cake can cost more, and name-dropping decades old version references trumps any quantity.  A foreign tea enthusiast recently upped even that ante, describing commitment level as best expressed by a percentage of overall income spent on tea.

Wuyi Origin Mi Lan Xiang Dan Cong; better teas don’t need to cost a significant percentage of your income

It seems all this really isn’t describing a general trend into expanding tea as a service-based experience versus a commodity.  The priciest local café here in Bangkok charges over $20 for a pot of tea, for a scant few grams; that’s at least back to purchasing an on-site experience.  

How to build that into the next version of a Starbucks, or did that prove to be a flawed goal?  Are these people focused as much on experience or on displaying status instead, or can the two really not be split?  It’s a bit of a tangent, but I’m reminded of a far more absurd topic coming up in an article about a golden taco:

The world’s most expensive taco is specially prepared at Grand Velas Los Cabos resort…  Ordering it will set you back $25,000 — almost the price of a new car.

The taco’s foundation is a gold-infused corn tortilla, which is then layered with Kobe beef and lobster. Toppings include black truffle Brie ($100 per ounce) and a dollop of Beluga caviar ($700 an ounce). Then, more layers of gold are added on top to finish…

Complaining about a $30 pot of tea and people spending enough to buy a car for a taco seem worlds apart.

These diverse threads make it hard to stick to the train of thought of what experiences people might want next related to tea, or what will become popular, and how expenses would factor in.  Seeking out traditional, quiet, feng shui designed cafes doesn’t seem likely to catch on. Even the committed tea bloggers I read sometimes speak of setting aside the better teaware and complex brewing processes due to just getting busy, maybe taking up a grandpa-style approach instead.

I drank Tazo ages ago; I have no hate for tea-bag based blends, I just don’t drink that

All the while in beginner-oriented tea groups I keep finding myself arguing the merits of basic, plain, inexpensive loose teas.  In one recent discussion, someone asked if mixing peanut butter powder into tea might work (and it might, I guess), and I wondered if that person ever tried a Tie Kuan Yin of any quality level before, or a single example of Chinese black tea.  It turned out they were really looking for Thai iced tea (which can be nice).

Plain, simple teas can be amazing experiences, but it’s only easy to package and sell the leaf.  It’s not as simple to bring the rest of the experience to everyone.

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Blast From the Past: The simple joys of a glass of green tea


Tea can be as complicated as you want it to be – what with its rituals and myriad details to handle. At the same time, it can be a simple delight. Being of Chaozhou (home of gongfu tea) descent, I fuss over the little details and continually experiment with getting the most out of each pot. At other times, though, I yearn for simplicity, but not in the form of a tea bag or the monstrosity known as the tea ball. Rather I am referring to glass-brewing loose-leaf tea, specifically green tea.

This is not to say this works exclusively for green tea; but for oolong tea, the full spectrum can only be unleashed by gongfu brewing. In contrast, green tea is favored for its brisk, refreshing quality, something that is, in fact, better served with a “lighter taste.” This works quite well for yellow and, to a lesser extent, for white tea as well, but my consumption of those two is less than that of green tea.

The How of It

It is really simple.

Step 1: Add tea leaves
Step 2: Add water
Step 3: Drink to about 1/3 and refill
Step 4: Repeat Step 3 until there is no more taste

It may be simplistic, but the results are pretty good. In fact, it tastes better than brewing out of a big pot because the heat may over-steep the tea leaves, leaving a lifeless and insipid liquid. It may not yield as flavorful a brew as using a gaiwan, but that’s the trade-off for the convenience factor.

The Why of It

To me, there is a simplistic charm about it. While the ceremonial ritual of gongfu brewing provides us a respite from the microwave culture we live in, it’s not practical to do all the time.

In the workplace, we can always provide ourselves with a timeout. Sip on a glass of Huangshan Maofeng and imagine breathing in the rejuvenating cool air of that gorgeous UNESCO heritage site. Savor the fruity nuances of Dongting Biluochun and fantasize about relaxing on the shores of Lake Tai.

Joy doesn’t always need to be complicated. It can be come in a simple, unassuming glass of tea.

Image Source

This article by Derek Chew was originally posted in May 2013.